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Photos of Mount St. Helens
From USGS Professional Paper 1250

These 75 photos and 142 pages of articles are from the 1981 publication (shown below - click on image for larger view):  The 1980 Eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington; Geological Survey Professional Paper 1250; edited by Peter W. Lipman and Donal R. Mullineaux (from 1981, 844 pages total).  They are FREE for you to use for any educational purpose (which does not violate U.S. government publication standards).  It is expected that proper photo credit be given, such as:  "Photo from: USGS Prof. Paper 1250, Fig. #nnn", for example.  For additional MSH (Mount St. Helens) information contact the Mount St. Helens Creation Information Center.

"The lessons of Mount St. Helens must not--and will not--be forgotten."

(From the Forward, by Dallas L. Peck,  Director, U.S. Geological Survey)

Start & Images    

TitlePage   Preface   Contents    

Volcanic Events, pg. 2
Mount St. Helens History, pg. 3-15
Eyewitnesses, pg. 53-67
Absolute Times, pg. 81-82, 86
Activity Sequence, pg. 127-134
Gas Studies, pg. 190-191
Chemical Compositions, pg. 233-250
Ash Clouds, pg. 323-333
Blast Dynamics, pg. 379-400
Rapid Deposition, pg. 466-478
Phreatic Explosions, pg. 509-511
New Lava Dome, pg. 540-544
Ash-Fall Deposits, pg. 568-584
Water Chemistries, pg. 659-664
River Water Quality, pg. 719-731
TIMELINE for MSH in 1980

   (Mountain had been  dormant since 1857)
March 27 - Earthquakes Began
Late March - Small periodic steam blasts
Late March - the North side began bulging
April 22 - Periodic steam blasts ceased
  (However earthquake rumblings continued)
May 7 - Steam blasts visible again, periodically
May 14 - Periodic steam blasts ceased
May 18, 8:32 AM PDT - Main eruption (for 9 hours)
May 25 - A small magmatic eruption occurred
June 12 - A small magmatic eruption occurred
July 22 - A small magmatic eruption occurred
October 16-18 - Small magmatic eruptions occurred

MSH_USGS.zip - ZIP file of these Articles & Images - 5.9 MB


  Images from Prior to the Main Eruption

Fig. #67

Fig. #415

Fig. #2

Fig. #17

Fig. #21

Fig. #19

Fig. #18

Fig. #68

Fig. #20

Fig. #83

N/A

Fig. #33

Fig. #199

Fig. #29

Fig. #31

 
  May 18, 1980 - Main Eruption (9 hours long) 

 

Fig. #23

Fig. #25

Fig. #191

Fig. #243

Fig. #224

Fig. #270

Fig. #289

N/A

N/A

Fig. #24

Fig. #177

Fig. #35

Fig. #297

Fig. #288

Fig. #76

 
  MSH (Mount St. Helens) Post-Eruption

 

Fig. #220

Fig. #360

N/A

N/A

Fig. #285

N/A

Fig. #278

Fig. #406

Fig. #407

Fig. #280

Fig. #279

Fig. #405

Fig. #274

N/A

Fig. #237

Fig. #235

Fig. #236

Fig. #412

Fig. #238

Fig. #265

Fig. #234

Fig. #138

Fig. #137

Fig. #132

Fig. #26

Fig. #27

Fig. #276

Fig. #28

Fig. #299

Fig. #34

Fig. #16

Fig. #32

Fig. #30

Fig. #133

Fig. #136

Fig. #291

Fig. #296

N/A

N/A

Fig. #307

 
  Mount St. Helens (MSH) Today

The volcanic eruptions on Mount St. Helens in the early 1980s caused catastrophic geological changes to the area (around and particularly to the) north of the mountain.  This 844 page volume documents some of these (7 Mountain Wonders) changes.  Stratographic layering happened within minutes!  Mud flows (later showing internal layering) changed local topography and became gouged by magnificent canyons (just like the Grand Canyon) within hours and days.

From the evidence presented in Geological Professional Paper 1250, no educated geologist today should believe that geological processes must take (millions) mythions and mythions of years.  That is nonsense; it is unscientific to contend such things in the light of the evidence shown from Mount St. Helens in the early 1980s.  USGS data like this photo (from above) shows clear scientific evidence of massive rapid sedimentary deposition, complete with internal layering.

This was followed by swift recovery in the months and years that followed.  It is less than a quarter century later - and yet a new forest is growing, and wildlife returned almost immediately - including elk within just 2 years.  Far from causing long-term devastation, the ash rained down high mineral content fertilizer over a wide area.  In only 100 years the surface evidence of these eruptions will have all but vanished.

And all of this reminds us that the Great Flood of Noah of 5,000 years ago (washing minerals and sediments across the continents), rearranging the surface of the entire planet, was devastating - but flora and fauna would have begun spreading and recovering quickly thereafter.  (text by P.A.)

Also see: McIntosh MSH Photos

Also see: Fleshman MSH Photos
 


Go to: Mount St. Helens Web Page

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